Local Trails


Cache Valley Trail Guide

With the help of our friends over at mtbproject.com, we have come up with a easy to use trail map.  This map will have all the trail descriptions with difficulty, GPS files, and rating included.  MTB Project also has an app that you can combine with the website that makes trail finding a breeze.  Just download the app, find the trail that you want to try, and save it to your phone for future use! Give some of our local trails a try, and come on in to Sunrise Cyclery for more info.



TRAIL DESCRIPTIONS

Our goal is to make sure that you have the best riding experience in Cache Valley. Knowing where trails are and what to expect can make all the difference. Years of biking skills and expertise at Sunrise Cyclery have led us to making the most complete trail guide for your use.   Detailed instructions of each trail are here to help you know where the turns are, find GPS locations, full trail maps, and many other details. At the bottom of each trail we have listed connecting trails for those looking for all day expeditions that link several trails into one.  Each trail is also divided into 3 technical ratings for fitness, and overall technicality. Green=Easy, Blue=Intermediate, Black=Advanced.  Ride times are also included.  These represent average times.  These can easily be done faster or slower depending on fitness level and experience.  Pick a trail, have some fun, and enjoy all Cache Valley has to offer!

 

TRAIL ETIQUETTE

Logan is home to countless miles of amazing bike trails that are only a short ride or drive away.  Biking these trails is a blast, and can stay this way if we’re all friendly, play by the rules, and do our part to make these trails enjoyable for everyone.  Listed are a couple of ways to keep everybody happy.

  • Uphill Bikers have the right of way

Keep the climbers happy and move to the side if you’re on your way down.  It may be tough to stop, but it’s harder for them to start over.

  • Be courteous to all trail users

Pass hikers at an extremely slow pace, walking if necessary.  Approach Animals with caution.  Sudden movements or sounds could scare horses, and lead to problems.  Communicate with horse riders from a distance and ask when it is okay to pass.  Follow directions from the horseback riders.

  • Stay On Designated trails

One of the most rewarding aspects of mountain biking is the scenery.  Lets keep the views and rides amazing by staying on the trails. Riding off the path causes damage to plants and growth.

 

Green Canyon


Season: May-Oct

Starting Point: Green Canyon Parking Lot

Style: Out and back, Shuttle

Traffic: High

Ride Time: 1.5 hrs

Distance: 3.8 M

Green Canyon is a local favorite, and a popular hotspot for those looking for a ride close to town.  The trail is a beginner singletrack that travels along the side of the canyon road, crossing at several points.  The road leads to the top of the trail leaving the option for a shuttle.  The trail is very smooth, with a few rocky sections, and a gradual incline that makes it enjoyable for anyone.  The way up has a few steep parts, but overall is a fairly easy climb.  From the parking lot the singletrack starts off, but is not open to bikers until further up the road.  Take the road for a couple hundred yards until you see the gate on the right, across the road from the cave/gravel hill.  Trees and foliage provide quite a bit of shade, and make for a beautiful scenic ride.  It’s plain to see where it got its name from when the trees and flowers start to bloom.  At the top you reach a roundabout that has a gate with a continuing singletrack.  You have the option to keep going until the wilderness boundary, or to descend from there.  The section past this gate has a small window in which it is rideable, as the grass tends to overgrow the trail and make for frustrating times and stinging shins.  (**PAST THE WILDERNESS BOUNDARY IS OFF LIMITS TO BIKES**) The descent is fast and fun.  Burmed turns and smooth dirt make for a quick and easy return back to the parking lot.  Watch for riders and hikers as this is a high traffic trail.

Connected trails:

Bonneville Shoreline

 

Providence Canyon

Season: April-October

Starting Point: Providence Canyon Parking Lot

Style: Out and back, Shuttle

Traffic: Medium

Ride Time: 1.5 Hrs

Distance: 2.8 M

For those looking for a close, but more technical ride, Prov Canyon is your option.  This is for the more technical rider as the trail is steep and rocky.  The road leads right to the top of the trial also leaving the option for a shuttle.  Once parked in the parking lot at the beginning of the dirt road, ride up the road and look carefully for a wooden bridge on the right crossing over the river (Be careful not to miss it, its hidden pretty well).  This trail is a steep one, with a few technical climbs through rocky sections.  At the section with the wooden walkways through a campground, there are two options.  Left will take you on the normal route with the same continuing climb up to the top where it shoots you out at a gravel road.  Right will take you on a section called B.J’s (named after the local who built it).  B.J’s is a newly designed section off the normal route.  Once you reach the gravel road at the top, you have the option to do the Outlaw loop, or turn around and head for home.  The Outlaw loop is a short 5 min section with dips and rollers through small ravines and dry creek beds that leads back to the top of the gravel road.  Look closely for the loop on the opposite side on the road on the corner (hard to spot at first, but a fun quick loop!).  Choose to descend either the normal route, or down B.J’s.  B.J’s is a very tight turned, and burmed out section that makes for an awesome descent.  Most riders take the normal route to the top, and B.J’s down to not interrupt the downhill traffic.  A very fast run, just make sure you watch for the roller towards the bottom.  It’s notorious for breaking collar bones after kicking the rider off the bike.

Connected trails:

Deer Fence

 

Bonneville Shoreline Trail


Season: April-Oct

Starting Point: First Dam, Green Canyon

Style: Out and back, Point A to B

Traffic: Low

Ride Time: 30 min

Distance: 2 M

There is not shore or lake involved in this trail at all.  Lake Bonneville is a prehistoric lake that covered almost all of Utah that is long gone now, but left a noticeable shoreline mark following the base of the mountains.  This is a very simple and easy trail leading from first dam to green canyon along that shoreline.  Park at First Dam and head into the tunnel leading underneath the highway.  It gets steep as the trail turns from pavement to dirt, and heads along the mountains.  The beginning here is the only real climb that you will see.  The scenery is beautiful looking over the valley from the shoreline.  There are two options for you to take. There is a wide gravel path that stretches the entirety of the way, or a hidden singletrack that starts partway on the trail if coming from First Dam.  Look for the singletrack on the east side (toward the mountains) for a more exciting path, or stick to the gravel for a more family friendly ride.

Connected Trails:

River Trail

Deer Fence

Green Canyon

 

Deer Fence


Season: April-Oct

Starting Point: First Dam, Dry Canyon, Providence Canyon Parking Lot

Style: Out and back, Point A to B

Traffic: Low

Ride Time: 30 min

Distance: 3 M

A good easy trail running along the Bonneville shoreline heading south.  Comparable to the Bonneville shoreline trail.  This run follows a fence and rises up and down throughout.  There are two ways to enter this trail. Option one is to drive to the parking lot at Dry Canyon, and take the trail that is on the south side of the entrance to the dirt road.  The second is a little tougher, and finding the trail can be a little tricky.  At First Dam, continue down past the dam for the road to turn into canyon road.  On the left is the Utah Water Research Lab.  Take the left into their parking lot, go right across the bridge to the building, and go behind the building.  Continue back there until you see a steep trail taking off on the left and head up it.  This will put you into a cul-de-sac.  The house on the left will have a faint trail taking off on the right side of the house.  Climb this until this puts you out on a grassy park area.  You will need to do a little street riding to get to the actual part of the trail from here.  Turn right onto Quail Way and head down the street until you run into Mountain Road.  Take a left and follow the road until it brings you to the base of Dry Canyon.  As soon as you pass over the grate and onto the dirt, you will see a gate with a trail on your right.  This will take you to the remainder of Deer Fence and lead you to the parking lot at the bottom of Providence Canyon.

Connected Trails:

Dry Canyon

River Trail

Bonneville Shoreline Trail

Providence Canyon

 

Jardine Juniper


Season: June-Oct

Starting Point: Wood Camp Campground

Style: Out and back

Traffic: Medium

Ride Time: 2 hrs

Distance: 4.5 M

Intermediate experience trail.  The climbing up to the top is fairly tough, and rocky at the beginning.  The scenery and surroundings are amazing all the way to the top.  If you’re looking to see wildlife, this is the spot to go.  The incline stays constant throughout the trail.  There are several switchback sections in between meadows.  Near the top there is a sign pointing two directions labeled with the “Scenic Route” or the “Shady Route”.  The shady route is smooth, and fast, while the Scenic is like the rest of the trail.  They both lead to the same place so you have the option to make it a loop, or stick to one trail.  Once you reach the point where the trails meet, and the path takes off down the mountain, you’ve reached the top.  The trail on from here is one you can hike that leads down to Jardine Juniper, the oldest Juniper tree in the U.S.  This short hike makes for a beautiful view looking down into the canyon, and a nice bench/deck area at the base of the tree, perfect for a lunch break.  Descending this trail is very fast and fun.  Rocks, tree roots, and ruts make for a fun time picking lines and maneuvering the bike.  The first meadow after the switchbacks has high bushes, and a few ruts.  Be careful not to blow out a turn, or fall to the mercy of the ruts as the high bushes make visibility low.  Depending on the time of year, the river near the bottom that you have to pass through, may be high and flowing.  Try to carry your momentum and make it through without steeping a foot in.  The lower section has a few real rocky spots, and then is basic back to the parking lot.

Connecting Trails:

None

 

Ricks Canyon


Season: June-Sep

Style: Loop options, out and back

Starting Point: Little Cottonwood Creek Parking Lot (Right Hand Fork)

Traffic: Low

Ride Time: 2 hrs

Distance: 3 M

If you see how in shape you are, go ahead and try this one.  The climb on this trail is very steep, and unless you’re a very experienced climber, there may be a few walk-a-bike sections.  The trail starts right from the parking lot and has a few splits in the trail.  Take a right at all of them.  The signs are pretty straight forward as to where the trail is.  When you take the last right, the climbing starts.  It gets steep quick, and doesn’t let up very much at all.  The trail is rocky and has big roots at parts.  Towards the end you run into some switchbacks that pump you out at the top and lead you to a dirt road.  You have the option of turning left on the road and making Steel Hollow your descent, or going down the way you came.  The descent is very steep again, and has some big rocks and boulders.  Traffic is usually low if not completely empty, so letting it rip down isn’t much of an issue. This trail is known for getting extremely overgrown in mid-July through August.  Once the fall cold comes, the foliage seems to cut back and make it rideable again.

Connecting Trails:

Steel Hollow

Mill Hollow

 

White Pine to Bunchgrass


Season: July-Sep

Starting Point: Tonys Grove Parking lot, Or Tonys Grove Horse Trailer Parking

Style: Shuttle

Traffic: White Pine-Medium

Bunchgrass-Low

Ride Time: 3 hrs

Distance: 10 M

If you’re looking for a gnarly fun descent with only a little climbing, this is your trail.  A short 3 mile climb leads you to 7 miles of downhill.  Both the downhill and uphill are technical, and require experience.  You will need two cars to shuttle this route.  Start by leaving one at the bottom of the Tonys Grove turn off.  There is a small parking lot on the right side as soon as your turn off the highway.  Drive up to the top where there is a parking area for Tonys Grove Lake.  You have to pay to get a spot here.  Your other option is the dirt road a few hundred yards back down the road that leads to horse trailer parking.  Park here and ride up the road to the original parking lot.  The White Pine Lake trailhead starts on the furthest right corner of the parking area.  There are a few turnoffs for Naomi Peak, but stick to the White Pine Lake signs.  You will ascend an intermediate climb for about 3 miles or so, with some tricky rock/boulder sections on your way.  After these climbs the real fun starts.  Ahead of you is 7 miles of nearly uninterrupted downhill.  This first descent is big rocks, and steep.  Good bike and wheel placement will help you loads here, and will make a grin on your face for the rest of the day.  This is the roughest descent on the ride.  You will cross a large bridge with a couple of intersecting trails.  Turning left will take you to the beautiful White Pine Lake, a popular camping area surrounded by mountains.  You’re welcome to bike to the lake for an awesome view, or take the trail to the right labeled “Bunchgrass”.  Descending these next miles will have a few loose rock sections, and continues to be steep.  You will have one last climb before making your way to the bottom.  Immortal beings, superhumans, and Bruce Lee are the only recorded people making it to the top of this hill.  So good luck.  Once you crest the top of this hill, the fast part is here.  Steep loose sections here and there lead to the fastest singletrack in the canyon.  No turns or rocks here, so pedal fast and have some fun.  Toward the bottom there is a split in the trail.  Both of them lead to the high way a few hundred yards later, so take either route.  Turn right when you reach the highway and pedal back to the turnoff where you left your first car.

Connecting Trails: None

 

Stump Hollow


Season: July-Oct

Starting Point: Beaver Creek Parking Lot

Style: Out and back, Loop

Traffic-Low

Ride Time: 2 hrs

Distance: To Pride Rock 2.8 M

To Sinks Meadow 3.2 M

Stump Hollow is a steep, but flowy run.  The steepness does make for a tough climb, but is a riot for the smooth downhill.  The parking lot for this ride is on the corner of the Highway and the turn off for Beaver Mountain, and Beaver Creek.  Turn left at the Beaver Mt road and immediately turn right into the dirt parking lot on the right.  Get on your bike and cross the street and turn right down the canyon.  The trail takes off on your left into the trees.  Ascending this trail is a hard climb with a few technical areas.  The climb is consistent through the trail, so careful not to burn yourself out.  The first part will wander through thick trees for several miles and lead you to the start of switchbacks.  There is a solid climb through these that is a fun one to challenge yourself on.  From here on out you have beautiful views as the trail looks down into meadows and Logan canyon.  Keep ascending until you reach a point us locals have named Pride Rock.  You will see the rock outcropping on your right after doing the last brutal climb through some loose terrain. The trail flattens out at the top here right next to Pride Rock.  You have the option of turning around here, or continuing on into the Sinks.  Past here the trail lightens up quite a bit.  There are still a few tricky sections, but the majority of your climbing is done.  After a few miles you will descend into a huge meadow.  This area is known as the sinks.  Continue on the singletrack until you reach the Karin (pile) of rocks.  This is the usual turn around point, or you have the option of going to make a loop through Burnt Fork, Or Turkey Trail.  After you climb back out of the Sinks, you have a few miles of fast and flowy.  The trail is skinny so careful not to slip off the left side down the hill.  After you pass Pride Rock it gets steep and fast.  Pedaling is rarely needed coming down the rest of the way.  Once you start, watch for the switchbacks.  You will see that one of the corners is notorious for being blown out.  The bushes are laid flat from all the bikes running out off the trail.  Watch for this corner.  The last mile of trail has kickers set up every hundred yards or so. The landings and takeoffs for these are relatively nice, so go ahead and launch off them.  Come back out the same way, and cross the street to get back to your car.

Connecting trails: Burnt Fork, Turkey Trail, Hodges Canyon

 

Sink Hollow


Season: July-Sep

Starting Point: Beaver Creek Parking Lot

Style: Out and back, Loop

Traffic: Low

Ride Time: 2 hrs

Distance: Out and back 4.1 m

Loop: ?

This trail will really test your technical climb and descending skills.  Big bouldery sections make for fun trial and error attempts on the uphill and downhill.  Begin this one by starting at the Beaver Creek Parking Lot. Go north up the road (not the highway) and take the first dirt road on your right.  Take your next left on what looks like an ATV road.  From here the trail will continually get more and more narrow until it turns into singletrack.  Ascending this trail can be tricky with all the rocky features.  The trail is not terribly steep, but is pretty tough because of all the eggshell like rocks/boulders covering the trail.  The trail will start to even out at the top and puts you out into a beautiful meadow with a lake.  Be careful not to stick around too long unless you have mosquito repellent, the bugs can be relentless depending on the time of year.  Descending from here leaves you two options.  You can make this trail a loop by continuing on the faint dirt road that goes on through the meadow and take the forest road back home.  You will pass a few cutoffs, but keep going until you hit the fork in the road.  Take a right and keep going until you run into several roads coming together.  Stick to the right of all of them to head south.  From here go straight all the way back to the parking lot.  Coming down the singletrack is a tricky, fun ride.  Dicey rock sections test your line picking skills, and allow for some tough terrain.  Follow the way you came back to the parking lot.

Connecting Trails:

None

 

River Trail


Season: May-Oct

Starting Point: First Dam, River Trail Parking

Style: Out and back

Traffic: Low

Ride Time: 2 hrs

Distance: 2 m

The River Trail is like the Bonneville Shoreline Trail with its simplicity.  The trail is very easy and consists of a basic gravel path that runs along the Logan River and Dams.  A great family friendly ride that is consistently flat, and relatively short.  The simplest way to access the trail is to park at First Dam, and ride the shoulder of the road for a minute.  On the right you will see a dirt road blocked by a gate with the sign “Stokes Nature Trail”.  Slide past the gate and cruise along the trail.  The other way to do this and to avoid the highway is to park at the first parking lot on your left after First Dam.  From that parking lot there is a bridge that crosses the river (north) to a building on the other side.  Turn right (east) and head up the canyon on the dirt road.  After a little bit there will be a path that takes off on your right and goes underneath the highway.  Go underneath and cross the bridge that leads to the trail.  The trail is popular in town attracting many walkers, hikers, and bikers.  Be careful, and watch for other people.  The trail ends with it turning into an intermediate single track, and climbing up the hill. Continue up this if you want to do the Spring Hollow Trail, or if you want to make it to Third Dam.  If not, turn around here and enjoy the smooth and scenic ride to the bottom of the canyon.

Connecting Trails:

Spring Hollow

Access to Third Dam

 

Spring Hollow

Season: May-Oct

Starting Point: First Dam

Style: Out and back

Traffic: Low

Ride Time: 2 hrs

Distance: To slate field from River Trail 4.1 m

To the very top ?

Spring Hollow is has a couple degrees of difficulty.  Starting from the River Trail is a good warm up to what you will face. As soon as the River Trail ends, the intermediate singletrack begins.  Switchbacks, and a few rocky areas can be expected through the first bit of climbing and descending.  During the first few sections you will see several trails taking off and forking.  Always take the one to the right to go towards Spring Hollow. Going left on any of these will take you back down to a trail running along the river.  The last fork will have a sign that says “Bridger Outlook”. Take a right here again.  This is where the climbing starts to pick up.  It gets steep pretty quick and starts going in towards the canyon.  Nice tree coverage make for a good cool ride, and great dirt.  The last climb to the slate field is a brutal one, and is what to expect the rest of the way to the top.  It will be pretty obvious when you reach the slate field, as there are no trees, and lots of rocks.  For the sake of your sanity, you can turn around here to enjoy the fun downhill, or you can choose your fate and try to climb to the top.  As I said, that last climb is just a taste of what the next 4 miles hold.  Walk-A-Bike will hold a whole new meaning in your life after this. But to those who conquer, we salute you.  This Advanced trail is extremely steep and rocky which makes the downhill worth it in the end.

 

 

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